Two veterans of the Internet wars debate the raging battle over who should control our entertainment

“If everyone’s a criminal, maybe the law is wrong. That’s the contention of Lawrence Lessig, who you might just say is DJ Danger Mouse’s patron saint. Less

“If everyone’s a criminal, maybe the law is wrong. That’s the contention of Lawrence Lessig, who you might just say is DJ Danger Mouse’s patron saint. Lessig, a professor at Stanford University Law School, is one of the leading advocates for changing copyright law. Via his popular blog, as well as in various books and media appearances, Lessig promotes the view that any system that makes criminals out of millions of otherwise law-abiding citizens ó like the more than 100,000 people who have downloaded Danger Mouse’s ‘The Grey Album,’ a groundbreaking but illegal mix of the Beatles’ ‘The White Album’ and Jay-Z’s ‘The Black Album’ ó is a broken system. The law must be updated to reflect the new digital reality, Lessig contends. But in that brave new digital world, how will artists pay their rent? Enter Internet pioneer Ken Waagner, who oversees all things online for the Chicago band Wilco. When a record label rejected Wilco’s ‘Yankee Hotel Foxtrot’ three years ago, Waagner and the band decided to put a streaming version of the entire album on the Wilco Web site. Commercial suicide, said music-industry conventional wisdom.”


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Date:
November 24, 2016
Author:
XPLANE