Sitemaps: map the user’s experience

“My previous article about sitemaps examined what they should be like. The conclusion was: sitemaps need to be complete and show metainformation. The secon

“My previous article about sitemaps examined what they should be like. The conclusion was: sitemaps need to be complete and show metainformation. The second conclusion was that it’s hard to build a good sitemap. In this article I try to focus on the true functions of search engines, navigation and sitemaps.” Also of interest, excerpted from peterme.com: “Cartographerrific! Peter van Dijck wrote me with an interesting development pertaining to how folks navigate a site he’s designed: ‘I wanted to share some usability testing I’ve been doing. After trying out several navigation methods, and testing different sitemaps with users, I decided to put a sitemap on every page. This is for a small content site (about 50 or so pages). The surprise was that the live statistics show that the sitemap, even though it is at the bottom of the page, is used for over 60% of all navigation on the site (except of course for the back button, which I can’t log automatically.)'”


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Date:
November 23, 2016
Author:
XPLANE