Pictorial Semiotics

Very academic. “All existing societies have been societies of information (and d[i]sinformation); all have been modern, from their point of view (at

Very academic. “All existing societies have been societies of information (and d[i]sinformation); all have been modern, from their point of view (at least since somebody first brought up the idea), and postmodernity will have to await the nuclear explosion or some other Fall of Man. But contemporary society possesses its peculiar mode of information, as Poster (1984) puts it, teaching once again historical dialectics to walk on its head (which will at least account for all the headaches of history). At present, pictorial significations would seem to permeate this mode of information, although in different ways from which this may have been true of some hypothetical preverbal period, or in the prehistory of (almost) universal alphabetization. Moreover, this contemporary mode of information is not the same in Europe and other more nearly occidentalized parts of the world, which are still (at least) paraverbal, as it is in the Third world, where, for the larger part of the population, the impact of television and publicity posters have preceded (and outdone) alphabetization.


Related Posts:

Process Problems Aren’t Just About Process

Triggering Change Using Three Words

Date:
November 23, 2016
Author:
XPLANE